Workforce Continuing Education


SCC plays an active role in the continuing education/life-long learning of the citizens of Columbus County. They college’s Workforce and Community Development Division provides the following educational opportunities:

Workforce Continuing Education Training

Workforce Continuing Education Training programs are designed to provide instructional opportunities for individuals seeking to gain new or upgrade current job-related skills. Programs can be delivered as a single course or bundled as a series of courses that provide instruction around skill competencies that lead to an industry-recognized credential (licensure, certification, renewal, registry listing) or meets local workforce labor needs.

Human Resources Development

The Human Resources Development (HRD) program provides skills assessment services, employability skills training, and career development counseling to unemployed and underemployed adults. HRD courses address six core components: assessment of an individual’s assets and limitations; development of a positive self-concept; development of employability skills; development of communication skills; development of problem-solving skills; and awareness of the impact of information technology in the workplace.

Basic Skills Programs

Basic Skills Programs are provided for students with low basic education skills in writing, reading, math, and computer literacy. Integrated education and training is provided to low-skilled adults, individuals with disabilities, literacy program participants, out-of-school youth, ex-offenders, and English language acquisition students. Students receive instruction and support as they complete the requirements for a nationally recognized high equivalency diploma.

Personal Interest (Community Service)

Community Service programs provide courses, seminars, and community activities that contribute to an individual’s cultural, civic, and personal growth.

Continuing Education Units

SCC awards continuing education units (CEUs) for non-credit occupational extension courses. CEUs will be awarded for non-credit courses satisfactorily completed on the basis of one CEU for each 10 hours of instruction. Fractions of CEUs will be awarded; thus, a student completing a 24-hour course will earn 2.4 CEUs. CEUs will not be awarded to students who fail to satisfactorily complete a course.

Student Transcripts

Students enrolling in continuing education courses will have a permanent transcript on file at Southeastern Community College which lists all non-credit training taken through the college.

The following procedures must be followed in order for official transcripts to be released:

  1. Occupational Extension/Community Service Transcript Request. Students must complete a Continuing Education Transcript Request form located on the college website and in the Continuing Education/Workforce & Community Development office in T-Building.
  2. GED/Transcript Request. Official North Carolina High School Equivalency Diploma (GED) transcript request can be fulfilled through DiplomaSender.com. Follow the instructions to request to your transcript or contact the Basic Skills Recruiter/HSE Examiner in T-112.

Admission and Registration

Adults 18 years of age or older and not enrolled in a secondary school may be admitted to continuing education classes. A minor, age 16 and 17, may enroll in Continuing Education course sections at SCC subject to the following:

  • Minors shall not displace
  • Minors shall pay the registration fees associated with the course section except for cases where they meet eligibility requirements for a fee waiver or financial
  • If the minor is enrolled in high school, the following restrictions apply:
    • Colleges shall not designate Continuing Education course sections taken by the high school student to provide partial or full credit towards meeting high school graduation requirements.
    • Colleges shall not offer Continuing Education course sections that are specifically scheduled for high school students except course sections that are part of an approved Workforce Continuing Education Career and College Promise Pathway (ID SBCCC 300.4 (c)(1)(D)).

The provisions within statue and code provide Workforce Continuing Education the ability to effectively respond to workforce training impacting minors, age 16 or 17, whether through the high school directly (juniors and seniors within an approved Workforce Continuing Education Career and College Promise pathway) or within the community broadly.

Minors, 16 and 17 years old, enrolling in Basic Skills classes must officially withdraw from public school and obtain a Minor Applicant form from appropriate public school personnel, and attend a required pre-enrollment meeting with the basic skills recruiter/HSE examiner. Both student and parent/legal guardian must be in attendance. To schedule an appointment, call (910) 788-6432.

A course schedule is published and made available to the public prior to the beginning of each semester. Courses which begin during a semester are announced through the media. Up-to-date schedule information may be obtained by calling the Workforce & Community Development Division at the college and/or accessing the class schedule (www.sccnc.edu/).

Class Location

Many continuing education courses and services are provided on the main campus. Other classes are conducted in surrounding communities or within a particular business or industry in Columbus County. Almost any course can and will be organized in specific geographical area of the county when a sufficient number of citizens indicate an interest in having a class brought to a particular location.

Course Descriptions

Although course descriptions for most continuing education offerings are not provided in this publication, examples of the types of courses that are offered are listed. Specific course descriptions are furnished upon request. Courses, in addition to those listed in this publication, may be offered to meet expressed needs of the community when evidence of these needs is presented to the college.

Expenses/Fee Structure*

Fee Schedule

$70 for 0-24 hours of instruction

$125 for 25-50 hours of instruction

$180 for 51 or more of instruction

Personal Interest (Community Service)

All personal interest classes are self-supporting. People enrolling in these courses are required to pay registration fees which are based on instructional costs associated with each class.

Additional Fee Information

  • Registration fees are waived for EMS, fire service, and law enforcement officers enrolling in courses designed to meet their training
  • Student insurance fees are charged for select

*Registration fees and supply costs associated with continuing education classes and/or seminars are subject to change without notice.

 Supplies and Materials

In special cases, students may be responsible for purchasing supplies and materials for continuing education classes. Books and many supplies are available through the college bookstore.

Continuing Education Refund Policy

The State Board of Community Colleges Code specifies the conditions for registration fee refunds for occupational extension classes:

  1. A full refund will be made if the college cancels a
  2. A student who officially withdraws from a continuing education membership hour class prior to the first class meeting shall be eligible for a 100 percent
  3. After the respective class begins, a 75 percent refund shall be made upon the request of the student if the student officially withdraws from the class prior to or on the 10 percent point of the scheduled hours of the class. (Note: This rule is applicable regardless of the number of times the class meets or the number of hours the class is scheduled to )
  4. A 100 percent refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from a contact hour class prior to the first day of class or if the college cancels the class. A 75 percent refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from a contact hour class on or before the 10% date of the
  5. Refunds of registration fees for community service, self-supporting classes and activities will be granted only in the case of paid pre-registration, if requested in writing to the vice president of workforce and community development prior to the first session of the class or
  6. If a student who paid the required registration fee for a semester or term dies during that semester or term, all registration fees for that semester or term may be refunded to the estate of the
  7. A full refund of registration fees will be granted to military reserve and National Guard personnel called to active duty or active personnel who have received temporary or permanent reassignments outside the state of North Carolina. In addition, the college will buy back textbooks through the college’s bookstore to the extent
  8. Request for refunds must be made in writing to the vice president of workforce and community development.

Basic Skills Programs

Adult Basic Education (ABE)

The purpose of the Adult Basic Education program is to provide instruction to those individuals who are functioning below a ninth-grade level. Instruction covers the fundamentals of mathematics, science, social studies, reading, digital literacy, and oral and written communication. Upon the completion of ABE-level courses, the individual should be equipped to enter the High School Equivalency Preparation program. For more information, interested persons should contact the Basic Skills Program at (910) 788-6326 or (910) 788-6432.

Adult Secondary Education (ASE)

The purpose or the Adult Secondary Education program is to prepare individuals for the official High School Equivalency test and enhance workplace employability skills. Instruction covers digital literacy, mathematics, social studies, science, reading, and language arts.

There are no registration fees. All materials have been specifically prepared for adults with emphasis on individual needs and interests. Off-campus sites are located throughout the county. The High School Equivalency Preparation program is available online to individuals who qualify.

For more information, interested persons should contact the Basic Skills Program at (910) 788- 6326 or (910) 788-6432.

High School Equivalency (HSE) Preparation

Those receiving an acceptable passing score on all sections of the HSE test will receive a High School Equivalency Diploma awarded by the State Board of Community Colleges. The sections of the HSE test are: Reasoning through Language Arts; Reading; Mathematical Reasoning; Social Studies; and Science. The test is given approximately every month. North Carolina has adopted three different high school equivalency diploma options. These tests are offered as a Computer-Based Testing (CBT) and Pencil-Based Testing (PBT).

  • HiSET (CBT & PBT) consists of 5 tests. The fee for taking the HiSET (CBT) is $53.75 or

$10.75 per test or (PBT) $75 or $15 per test.

  • TASC (PBT only) consists of 5 tests. The fee for taking the TASC is $56 or $11.20 per
  • Pearson (GED Testing Service/CBT only) consists of 4 tests. The fee for taking the GED test is $80.

Accommodations are available for test takers with diagnosed disabilities that include, but are not limited to:

  • Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Psychological or psychiatric disorders
  • Learning and other cognitive disabilities
  • Physical disorders/chronic health disabilities
  • Intellectual disabilities
  • Hearing and visual impairment

HSE test is accepted as a valid means of awarding a high school diploma. Most employers and training programs accept HSE in the same manner as traditional high school diplomas. In addition, students may enroll in any community college program with the HSE diploma. Universities will accept HSE graduates after they meet other admission requirements. Students usually complete their first two years at a community college and then transfer to a four-year school. Certain branches of the military will also accept HSE graduates while some branches may have additional requirements.

Adults who have not completed high school may take the HSE test at SCC.

Adult Basic Education for Individuals with Disabilities

SCC provides instruction for individuals with developmental disabilities at sites throughout Columbus County. Individuals enrolled in this program learn the fundamentals of mathematics, science, social studies, reading, technology, and oral and written communication. At the same time instructors are preparing students for employment and economic self-sufficiency. For more information, interested persons should contact the Basic Skills Program at (910) 788-6326 or

(910) 788-6432.

English Language Learners (ELL)

The English Language Acquisition Program is designed for individuals whose native language is not English. These classes include instruction in literacy and English language acquisition, instructions on the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and civic participation and may include workforce training. Interested students are encouraged to enroll in the Basic Skills program in the college’s Basic Skills Lab (B-103) and at locations throughout Columbus County.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT TRAINING PROGRAMS

Occupational Extension

Occupational extension courses are designed to provide training in a specific area. These courses may teach a new skill or upgrade present skills, leading to job promotion, supplemental income, or employment. Instructional activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

Healthcare Pathways include: Certified Professional Coders Exam Prep Medical Billing & Coding (CPT & ICD-10) Medical Office Assistant, Medical Terminology, Medication Aide Exam Prep (Adult Group Home) Medication Aide Exam Prep (Skilled Nursing) Nurse Aide I & II, Nurse Aide I Refresher, Nurse Aide II Competency Evaluation (Refresher) Ophthalmic Assistant, Personal Home Care Aide Pharmacy Technology, and Pharmacy Technology Exam Prep

General Workforce Training: Accounting Banking Bartending, Career Readiness Certificate, Construction Trades (Masonry, HVAC, Electrical, Carpentry) Culinary Arts, DSS Caseworker Phase I & II Effective Teacher Training Grant Writing, and Sign Language Small Engine Repair Spanish Welding/Pipefitting

Computer Skills: Computer Programming Digital Photography, Intro to Computers & Microsoft Office Applications Intro to PC Maintenance, QuickBooks Social Media Web Design,

Industrial Training: Computer Numerical Control (CNC) General Industry Forklift, OSHA 10-Hour General Industry Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) SCC Manufacturing Technician Welding

Instructor-Facilitated On-Line Learning: Accounting & Finances Business and Management Computer Applications Computer Fundamentals Grant Writing/Non-Profit Healthcare & Medical Languages, and Teaching and Education Veterinary Assistant Writing and Publishing

NCWorks Customized Training Program (CTP)

SCC’s Customized Training Program (CTP) provides education, training and support services for new, expanding and existing business and industry in Columbus County. The goal is to foster and support three key aspects of a company’s well-being:

  • Job Growth
  • Technology Investment
  • Productivity Enhancement
    Services range from:
  • Job profiling
  • Pre-employment training and assessment
  • Post-hire technical and critical soft skills training For more information, call (910) 788-6208.

Management Development Programs

In an effort to meet the supervisory and managerial needs of business and industry, a progressive program in management development training is offered by SCC. Emphasis is placed on improving the competency of supervisory and mid-management personnel as well as on developing the potential of persons interested in becoming supervisors. Programs are tailored to meet local needs and are conducted on the campus or within an individual plant or organization.

Topics/programs include the following: Leadership Development Communication Skills, ISO 9000, Team Building Quality, Problem Solving

Instructor-Facilitated On-line Learning

Instructor-facilitated on-line courses are designed to provide opportunities to update personal/professional skills, discover a new talent, or chart a career path at one’s own convenience and/or pace.

Course offerings through the Education to Go site include, but are not limited to, the following categories: Computer Fundamentals, Computer Applications, Business and Management, Grant Writing/Non Profit, Healthcare, Languages Networking/Troubleshooting, Veterinary Assistant, Writing and Publishing, Teaching and Education

SCC also offers courses in EMS, Healthcare and Volunteer Management through the college’s Moodle site.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Training

Courses are designed to prepare competent entry-level EMS personnel in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective learning domains required for the pre-hospital emergency setting. Courses include, but are not limited to, the following: Emergency Medical Responder (EMR), Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) Paramedic, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, International Trauma Life Support

Technical Rescuer Series

Courses are designed to encompass the total spectrum of the Emergency Rescue Technician Program.

Courses include, but are not limited to, the following: Technical Rescuer, Technical Rescuer (Vehicle), Technical Rescuer (Ropes, Trench, Structural Collapse, Water Rescue, Confined Space, and Machinery and Agriculture)

Fire Service Training

Fire Service Training can be taken directly to the individual firefighting groups to meet their needs. Training sessions are held in the local fire departments, allowing personnel to be trained as an organized group and utilize equipment they would ordinarily use in controlling fires. Fire Service courses include, but are not limited to, the following:

Fire Fighter Certification HazMat Level One Responder, Fire Life Safety Educator Training, NC First Apparatus Driver-Operator Certification (Driver Operator Training, Pump Operations Training, and Aerial Operations Training)

A more detailed listing of classes can be obtained by contacting the Workforce and Community Development Division.

Law Enforcement Training

Law enforcement courses are specially designed as in-service education for those engaged in law enforcement activities and are provided at the request of local law enforcement agencies.

Program emphasis is on legal and technological law enforcement advancements. Workshops and courses such as the following are offered in many areas, but are not limited to:

Department of Public Safety In-Service Training Laws of Arrest, Search, and Seizure, Traffic Accident Investigation Motor Vehicle Laws, Traffic Interdiction Narcotics Investigation, Court Structure & Procedure Legal Updates, Police Administration Operators School, Riot and Crowd Control Criminal Investigation Fingerprint Identification Juvenile Law, Juvenile Minority Sensitivity Training Police-Community Relations, Career Survival Topics Firearms Training Chemical Tests for Alcohol Bloodbourne Pathogens Hazardous Materials Radar Operator, Radar Re-certification

Nurse Aide

Nurse Aide I

This course prepares graduates to provide personal care and to perform basic nursing skills for the elderly and other adults. Emphasis is on the aging process including mental, social and physical needs of the elderly, patient’s rights, nutrition management, elimination procedures, safe environment, restorative services, personal and special care procedures and activities, human body structure, function and related common disease/disorders, communication and documentation, death and dying, and role of the nurse aide and health team members. The course includes class, laboratory and clinical learning experiences and prepares the graduate for competency evaluation required for nurse aide listing. Upon satisfactory completion of the course and the state approved competency evaluation, the graduate is eligible to apply for listing as a Nurse Aide I by the N.C. Division of Health Services Regulation. In all employment settings, the listed Nurse Aide I will work under the direction and supervision of licensed personnel. Prerequisite: High School Diploma or High School Equivalency Diploma (formerly known as GED).

Nurse Aide II

Nurse Aide II prepares graduates to perform more complex skills for patients or residents regardless of the setting. The course includes class, laboratory and clinical learning experiences. Upon satisfactory completion of the course, the graduate is eligible to apply for listing as a Nurse Aide II by the North Carolina Board of Nursing. In all employment settings, the listed Nurse Aide II will work under the direction and supervision of licensed personnel. Prerequisite: High School Diploma or HSE and current listing on the N.C. Nurse Aide I Registry.

Course Admission Requirements

SCC Requirements

  • Submission of a copy of high school diploma or HSE
  • Submission of an official copy of test scores with a minimum ACT score of 22, minimum SAT score of 500, TABE reading test score (576 minimum scale on 11D or 12D test), or CASAS reading test score (244 minimum scale score).

Continuation

Enrollment and continuation in nurse aide courses is contingent upon the submission of the required documentation on or before the specified date communicated by the college. Additional requirements include, but are not limited to:

  • Malpractice insurance (paid upon registration for class)
  • OSHA training on Standard Precautions and Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Successful completion of Basic Cardiac Life Support
  • Certification from students of the ability to perform essential
  • Certification from students that provides evidence that they meet the conditions of physical health and/or physical capability at a level that is acceptable to and in keeping with safe nursing care to the
  • Certification from students that provides evidence that they meet the conditions of emotional health at a level that is acceptable to and in keeping with safe nursing care to the public
  • Completed health form with current physical examination (done within 12 months prior to class end)
  • TB test within 12 months prior to class end
  • Immunizations (required)
    • Three DPT or Tetanus vaccines (one within last 10 years)
    • Two MMRs or two rubeolas (measles), one mumps, one rubella (German measles) or proof of positive titers
    • Completed Hepatitis B series or declination statement
    • Documented history of varicella or two doses of varicella vaccine or positive varicella titer
    • Other requirements as listed by the clinical agency

Students accepted into nurse aide courses with previous physical, emotional, or behavioral problems which conflict with the safety essential to nurse aide practice must provide professional certification that appropriate treatment and/or counseling has taken place and that the problem has been adequately accommodated.

Eligibility for Listing on Nurse Aide I Registry and Nurse Aide II Registry

Students earning a grade of S in the Nurse Aide I course will receive a certificate of course completion from SCC and will be eligible to apply for the written and skills competency examinations administered though Pearson Vue. Students must successfully complete the written and skills competency examinations administrated by Pearson Vue to be eligible to apply for listing on the NC Nurse Aide I Registry with the NC Division of Health Services Regulation.

Applicants who are currently listed on the Nurse Aide I Registry and who meet current Nurse Aide II course admission requirements may enroll in Nurse Aide II. Students earning a grade of S in the Nurse Aide II course will receive a certificate of course completion from SCC and will be eligible to apply for listing on the NC Nurse Aide II Registry with the NC Board of Nursing.

Relationship with Clinical Agency

From a safety perspective, the users of alcohol and drugs may impair the well-being of themselves and the persons they serve in the clinical setting. In addition, the contract between SCC and a clinical agency requires that the college abide by the existing rules and regulations of the agency. Clinical agencies may require acceptable criminal background checks and drug screens prior to participating in clinical. The college follows agency protocol regarding drug screening and criminal background checks. The college agrees to not assign or to withdraw any student from the clinical agency when the student is unacceptable to the agency because of health, performance, a positive drug screen or criminal background check, or other reasonable causes. Without access to the clinical facilities, the student will be unable to satisfactorily complete the nurse aide courses.

Students may be required, at their own expense, to be tested for consumption of alcohol/drugs for cause at any time while in this program. Clinical sites control work in their facility.

Dismissal of Students

Faculty teaching nurse aide courses follow published college policies and practices that provide for identification and dismissal of students who do the following:

  • Demonstrate physical or emotional problems which conflict with the safety essential to nursing practice and do not respond to appropriate treatment and/or counseling within a reasonable period of
  • Demonstrate unsafe clinical practices or behavior which conflicts with safety essential to nurse aid practice.

Students who demonstrate behavior that conflicts with safety essential to nurse aide practice can be dismissed from nurse aide courses regardless of whether treatment or counseling has occurred. Re-admission of students who were dismissed from the program for physical, emotional, or behavioral problems which conflicted with the safety essential to nurse aide practice is contingent on professional documentation that appropriate treatment and/or counseling has taken place and that the problem has been adequately accommodated.

Pharmacy Technology

The course is designed to prepare individuals with the theoretical, technical, and clinical sills needed to assist and support licensed pharmacists in providing prescription medications, over-the- counter drugs, medical equipment and supplies, pharmaceutical care services, and other health care products and services for patients. Class format includes lecture, laboratory, and clinical activities.

Successful completion prepares individuals for employment as a pharmacy technician in hospitals and pharmacies. After completion of class, individuals may be eligible to sit for national certification as a Certified Pharmacy Technician (CPhT). Prerequisite: High School Diploma or High School Equivalency Diploma (formerly known as GED).

Course Admission Requirements

SCC Requirements

  • Submission of a copy of high school diploma or HSE
  • Submission of an official copy of test scores with a minimum ACT score of 22, minimum SAT score of 500, TABE reading test score (576 minimum scale score on 11D or 12D test) and math test score (577 minimum scale score on 11D or 12D test), or CASAS reading test score (244 minimum scale score) and math test score (231 minimum scale score).

Continuation

Enrollment and continuation in pharmacy technology courses is contingent upon the submission of the required documentation on or before the specified date communicated by the college.

Additional requirements include, but are not limited to:

  • Malpractice insurance (paid upon registration for class)
  • OSHA training on Standard Precautions and Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Successful completion of Basic Cardiac Life Support
  • Certification from students of the ability to perform essential
  • Certification from students that provides evidence that they meet the conditions of physical health and/or physical capability at a level that is acceptable to and in keeping with safe care to the
  • Certification from students that provides evidence that they meet the conditions of emotional health at a level that is acceptable to and in keeping with safe care to the public
  • Completed health form with current physical examination (done within 12 months prior to class end)
  • TB test within 12 months prior to class end
  • Immunizations (required)
    • Three DPT or Tetanus vaccines (one within last 10 years)
    • Two MMRs or two rubeolas (measles), one mumps, one rubella (German measles) or proof of positive titers
    • Completed Hepatitis B series or declination statement
    • Documented history of varicella or two doses of varicella vaccine or positive varicella titer
    • Other requirements as listed by the clinical agency

Students accepted into pharmacy technology courses with previous physical, emotional, or behavioral problems which conflict with the safety essential to pharmacy technology practice must provide professional certification that appropriate treatment and/or counseling has taken place and that the problem has been adequately accommodated.

Eligibility for Listing with the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board

Students earning a grade of S in the pharmacy technology course will receive a certificate of course completion from SCC and will be eligible to apply for the Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam administered though Pearson Vue. Students must successfully complete the written examination administrated by Pearson Vue to be eligible for listing on the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board.

Relationship with Clinical Agency

From a safety perspective, the users of alcohol and drugs may impair the well-being of themselves and the persons they serve in the clinical setting. In addition, the contract between SCC and a clinical agency requires that the college abide by the existing rules and regulations of the agency. Clinical agencies may require acceptable criminal background checks and drug screens prior to participating in clinical. The college follows agency protocol regarding drug screening and criminal background checks. The college agrees to not assign, or to withdraw, any student from the clinical agency when the student is unacceptable to the agency because of health, performance, a positive drug screen or criminal background check, or other reasonable causes. Without access to the clinical facilities, the student will be unable to satisfactorily complete the nurse aide courses.

Students may be required, at their own expense, to be tested for consumption of alcohol/drugs for cause at any time while in this program. Clinical sites control work in their facility.

Dismissal of Students

Faculty teaching pharmacy technology courses follow published college policies and practices that provide for identification and dismissal of students who do the following:

  • Demonstrate physical or emotional problems which conflict with the safety essential to pharmacy technology practice and do not respond to appropriate treatment and/or counseling within a reasonable period of
  • Demonstrate unsafe clinical practices or behavior which conflicts with safety essential to pharmacy technology

Students who demonstrate behavior that conflicts with safety essential to pharmacy technology practice can be dismissed from pharmacy technology courses regardless of whether treatment or counseling has occurred. Re-admission of students who were dismissed from the program for physical, emotional, or behavioral problems which conflicted with the safety essential to pharmacy technology practice is contingent on professional documentation that appropriate treatment and/or counseling has taken place and that the problem has been adequately accommodated.

Medical Office Assistant

The course will prepare individuals for national certification as a Certified Medical Administrative Assistant (CMAA). Individuals enrolled in the course will have the opportunity to learn skills required to work in a medical office setting. Topics include medical terminology; communication skills; vital signs; CPR; administrative duties; office procedures; and introduction to medical coding and insurance billing and coding. Upon successful completion of the class, individuals will be eligible to take the Certified Medical Administrative Assistant (CMAA) exam given by National Healthcareer Association (NHA). Prerequisite: High school diploma or high school equivalency diploma (formerly known as GED).

Course Admission Requirements

SCC Requirements

  • Submission of an official copy of high school transcript verifying graduation, adult high school diploma, or high school equivalency
  • Submission of an official copy of test scores with a minimum ACT score of 22, minimum SAT score of 500, TABE reading test score (576 minimum scale score on 11D or 12D test) and math test score (577 minimum scale score on 11D or 12D test), or CASAS reading test score (244 minimum scale score) and math test score (231 minimum scale score).

Eligibility for Listing with the National Healthcareer Association (NHA)

Students earning a grade of S in the medical office assistant course will receive a certificate of course completion from SCC and will be eligible to apply for the Certified Medical Administrative Assistant (CMAA) exam administered by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA). Students must successfully complete the written examination administered by NHA to be eligible for listing as a Certified Medical Administrative Assistant (CMAA).

NCWorks Career Center

The Columbus County NCWorks Career Center at Southeastern Community College is a user- friendly facility providing job seekers, training seekers and employers access to a variety of employment and training services. The Center also serves as a connection between employers and qualified workers.

In the NCWorks Career Center, customers come first. By offering a wide range of service options, from self-service to full-service, the NCWorks Career Center offers comprehensive training and employment services to the community, all under one roof. Free services available include career and personal assessments, employment readiness preparation, short-term skills training, job placement assistance, resume preparation, and career counseling.

Students and job seekers have access to the Career Resource Center for extensive career exploration and job search efforts. Customers also have access to representatives from NC Vocational Rehabilitation, NC Disabled Veterans Outreach Program, NC Commission of Indian Affairs, NC Commerce Division of Workforce Solutions, Job Corp, and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

Businesses can access applicant resumes and referrals, review labor market information and on- the-job training programs, receive prescreened applications, utilize space for interviewing job applicants, and receive employment and training services customized to their needs.

Located in A-Building, the Center is open Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Columbus County NCWorks Career Center is chartered by the Cape Fear Workforce Development Board and the NC Department of Commerce.

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA)

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) is the nation’s principal workforce development legislation, providing funds to address the employment and training needs of adults, dislocated workers and youth. WIOA is intended to be customer-focused, to help customers (current workers and job seekers) access the tools they need to manage their careers through information and high quality services, and to help U.S. companies find skilled workers.

Southeastern Community College operates WIOA Title I programs for adults, dislocated workers, and youth under contract from the Cape Fear Workforce Development Board and through the operation of the Columbus County NCWorks Career Center located in A-Building.

Through WIOA Title I, eligible students may receive financial assistance with books and fees, uniforms, training-related supplies, and licensing fees. Individuals enrolled in WIOA programs must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in selected classes, and meet regularly with assigned counselors. Participant follow-up services are provided for one year after exiting from the program. Businesses may also receive financial assistance through the On-the-Job Training (OJT) Program to offset the costs of training new employees who are Columbus County residents.

Small Business Center

The mission of the Small Business Center (SBC) is to increase the success rate and number of viable small businesses in North Carolina by providing high quality, readily accessible assistance to prospective and existing small business owners which will lead to job creation and retention.

Business seminars, confidential business counseling, loan program information and vital resources are offered to residents of Columbus County free of charge.

The Center works cooperatively with businesses, civic leaders, organizations, state and local governments, universities and other colleges in promoting assistance to small business firms. In addition, the Center facilitates a Microenterprise Loan Program through the NC Rural Center that provides access to loans from $500 to $50,000 on a group lending basis for business start-up or expansion; and offers entrepreneurship training in adult students through a 24-hour continuing education program entitled REAL—Rural Entrepreneurship through Action Learning in which the participants develop entrepreneurial traits, knowledge and skills to create and operate a small business.

The Small Business Center has a resource library that contains books, pamphlets, cd’s, business magazines, and other related materials, all available on a checkout basis.

For more information about the Small Business at Southeastern Community College, call (910) 788-6419 or (910) 788-6397.

Off-Campus Educational Programs

Continuing Education

SCC strives to make classes and programs accessible throughout the county. Classes are offered in places such as the Columbus County and Whiteville school systems’ facilities, rescue squad facilities, fire departments, industrial training centers, business locations, churches, and community centers. The courses offered in off-campus settings meet the same criteria as do classes being offered on campus.

WORKFORCE & CONTINUING EDUCATION

PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Southeastern Community College’s Workforce Continuing Education training programs and services provide employer/customer–driven instructional opportunities for individuals seeking to gain new and/or upgrade current job-related skills. Training programs can be delivered as a single course or bundled as a series of courses; and provide instruction around skill competencies that lead to a recognized credential (licensure, certification, renewal, registry listing) and/or meet local workforce labor needs. Additionally, opportunities are provided for people to obtain a high school equivalency diploma, start and/or expand a small business, as well as experience personal growth.

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (ABE)

The purpose of the Adult Basic Education program is to provide instruction to those individuals who are functioning below a ninth grade level. Instruction covers the fundamentals of mathematics, science, social studies, reading, and oral/written communication. There are no registration fees. All materials have been specifically prepared for adults with emphasis on individual needs and interests. Upon the completion of ABE level courses, the adult should be equipped to enter the High School Equivalency Preparation program. The online High School Equivalency Program is available to individuals who qualify.

ADULT SECONDARY EDUCATION

The High School Equivalency (HSE) program offers instruction to assist learners in preparing to successfully pass a designated high school equivalency assessment. The three nationally-recognized assessments used to obtain a High School Equivalency Diploma awarded by the State Board of Community Colleges are Pearson (GED Testing Service), HiSET® and TASC. All three High School Equivalency assessments are recognized by US Department of Education and cover the same content areas. Both the HiSet and TASC are offered as a Computer-Based Testing (CBT) and Pencil-Based Testing (PBT). Passing any one of the assessments will lead to the same High School Equivalency Diploma issued by the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER

The English Language Learner program is designed for individuals whose native language is not English. These classes provide instruction in conversational communication. Interested students are encouraged to enroll in the Basic Skills program in the college’s Basic Skills Lab (B-103) and at locations throughout Columbus County.

ON-LINE LEARNING

Online courses are designed to provide opportunities to update personal/professional skills, discover new talent, or chart a career path at one’s own convenience and/or pace.

NCWORKS CUSTOMIZED TRAINING PROGRAM

The NCWorks Customized Training Program (CTP) is designed to provide customized training assistance in support of full-time production and direct customer service positions created in Columbus County, thereby enhancing the growth potential of companies located in the county while simultaneously preparing Columbus County’s workforce with the skills essential to successful employment in emerging industries.
In order to receive assistance, eligible businesses and industries must demonstrate two or more of the following criteria:

  • Job Growth
  • Technology Investment
  • Productivity Enhancement

LICENSURE AND CERTIFICATIONS

A significant number of occupations in North Carolina require licensure and/or certification as a prerequisite to employment. Licensure and certifications are granted by an independent agency or board. For many of these occupations, the educational requirement consists of short term workforce continuing education courses offered at SCC.

WORKFORCE AND CONTINUING EDUCATION TRAINING (OCCUPATIONAL EXTENSION)

Workforce continuing education classes are designed to provide training in a specific area. The courses may teach a new skill or upgrade present skills leading to job promotion, supplemental income, or employment.

SMALL BUSINESS CENTER

The mission of the Small Business Center (SBC) is to increase the success rate and a number of viable small businesses in North Carolina by providing high quality, readily accessible assistance to prospective and existing small business owners which will lead to job creation and retention. Business seminars, confidential business counseling, loan program information, and vital resources are offered free of charge.

PERSONAL INTEREST

Courses offered for personal growth or enjoyment are considered personal interest classes. They cover a variety of topic areas and are designed to make interested students stronger, well-rounded individuals as well as enhance the quality of life.

COLUMBUS COUNTY NCWORKS CAREER CENTER

Southeastern Community College serves as the host agency for the Columbus County NCWorks Career Center which is instrumental in connecting talent with local area employers. The Center provides job-training programs and services to help interested customers increase their skill sets and obtain meaningful employment.

At the NCWorks Career Center, customers have free access to labor market information and computers to search for job opportunities, along with access to job fairs and workshops that will help them connect with employers. Also, individuals can find out how to earn a Career Readiness Certificate, which is a recognizable skills credential that facilitates job placement, retention, and advancement.

The Center staff will help customers set up their profile on NCWorks Online, the state’s official job search portal. Having a profile on NCWorks Online exposes individuals to employers across NC as well as matches their skills with those required for a job and provides access to wage and occupation projections.

CONTINUING EDUCATION STUDENT REGISTRATION

Students registering for a continuing education class will complete a continuing education registration form, pay a registration fee, and sign receipt roster. (Procedure 3.1.9) Persons 18 years of age or older are eligible to enroll in continuing education offerings. Minors, 16 and 17-year-olds, enrolling in Basic Skills classes must officially withdraw from public school and obtain a Minor Applicant form from appropriate public school personnel, and attend a required pre-enrollment meeting with the High School Equivalency Diploma Examiner. Both student and parent/legal guardian must be in attendance. To schedule an appointment, call 910.642.7141, ext. 432.

REGISTRATION FEE(S) AND OTHER COSTS

  • Occupational Extension/Workforce Continuing Education registration fees are set by the NC Legislators.
  • Current fees are:
    • 0– 24 hours $ 70
    • 25– 50 hours $125
    • 50+ hours $18
  • Note: Registration fees are waived for EMS, fire service, and law enforcement officers enrolling in courses designed to meet their training requirements.
  • High School Equivalency testing fee(s) vary. Contact the High School Equivalency Diploma Examiner, for more information at 910.642.7141, ext. 432.
  • Personal Development (community service) class registration fees are based on all instructional costs associated with each class.
  • Student insurance fees are charged for select courses.
  • Supplies and materials are needed for some classes.
  • Registration fees and supply costs associated with classes are subject to change without prior notice.

METHOD(S) OF PAYMENT

All fees may be paid by cash, check or money order.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Financial assistance with registration fees and books to gain new employment-related skills may be available through the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and other funding sources. Interested persons should contact the Columbus County NCWorks Career Center located in the A Building or 910.642.7141 ext. 261.

REGISTRATION FEE REFUNDS

Registration fee refunds are made only under the following circumstances:

  • A full refund will be made if the College cancels a class.
  • A student who officially withdraws from a continuing education class prior to the first class meeting shall be eligible for a 100 percent refund.
  • After the respective class begins, a 75 percent refund shall be made upon the request of the student if the student officially withdraws from the class prior to or on the ten percent point of the scheduled hours of the class. (Note: This rule is applicable regardless of the number of times the class meets or the number of hours the class is scheduled to meet.)
  • A 100 percent refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from a contact hour class prior to the first day of class or if the College cancels the class. A 75 percent refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from a contact hour class on or before the tenth calendar day of the class.
  • Refunds of registration fees for community service self-supporting classes and activities will be granted only in the case of paid pre-registration if requested in writing to the VP of Workforce and Community Development prior to the first session of the class.
  • If a student who paid the required registration fee dies during that semester, all registration fees for that semester or term may be refunded to the estate of the deceased.
  • A full refund of registration fees will be granted to military reserve and National Guard personnel called to active duty or active personnel who have received temporary or permanent reassignments outside the state of NC. In addition, the College will buy back textbooks through the college’s bookstore to the extent possible.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS

SCC awards continuing education units (CEUs) for non-credit occupational extension/workforce continuing education courses. CEUs will be awarded for non-credit courses satisfactorily completed on the basis of one CEU for every 10 hours of instruction. Fractions of CEUs will be awarded; thus, a student completing a 24-hour course will earn 2.4 CEUs. CEUs will not be awarded to students who fail to satisfactorily complete a course.

TRANSCRIPTS

Students enrolling in workforce/continuing education courses will have a permanent transcript on file at Southeastern Community College which lists all non-credit training taken through the college.

  • Occupational Extension/Personal Interest Transcript Request. Students must complete a Continuing Education Transcript Request form located on the College website and in the Workforce and Community Development Division office in T-building.
  • Official North Carolina High School Equivalency Diploma (GED) Transcript Request. Contact the High School Equivalency Diploma Examiner 910.642.7141, ext. 432.

COURSE SCHEDULE

A course schedule is published and made available to the public prior to the beginning of each semester. Courses that begin during a semester are announced through the media. Up-to-date schedule information may be obtained by calling the Workforce and Community Development Division at the College and/or accessing the class schedule (www.sccnc.edu).

CLASS LOCATION

Many continuing education courses and services are provided on the main campus. Other classes are conducted in surrounding communities or within a particular business or industry in Columbus County. Almost any course can and will be organized in a specific geographical area of the county when a sufficient number of citizens indicate an interest in having a class brought to a particular location.

CLASS/SEMINAR/WORKSHOP CANCELLATION(S)

SCC’s Workforce and Community Development Division reserves the right to cancel classes/seminars/workshops due to insufficient pre-registration and/or enrollment. A course may be canceled if fewer than eight (8) students enrolled. Many classes require that students are in attendance for the first class meeting.

STUDENT WITHDRAWALS – CONTINUING EDUCATION

Continuing Education students may withdraw from a class at any time during the semester. The instructor is required to withdraw a student from a class if he/she has missed five consecutive class meetings without contacting the instructor. Withdrawals must be indicated on the attendance sheet with a “W” on the date the student is withdrawn. (Procedure 3.1.26)

IDENTIFICATION CARDS

All Workforce Continuing Education Nurse Aide and Pharmacy Tech students must obtain SCC photo identification (ID) cards. Cards are issued in the Nesmith Student Center. Students must present a valid driver’s license or state-issued ID card and their class schedule at the time the ID card is made.

The student ID card is valid for one academic year ending in August of each year. SCC ID cards must be displayed visibly on the outer clothing at all times while on campus, and under no circumstances should they be altered or lent to another person. The card may be required for identification or participation in various student activities or events. The ID card also serves as a library card for curriculum students. Persons who do not have and/or display proper identification may be subject to disciplinary sanctions and/or asked to leave campus.

Temporary ID cards will be issued to students and staff at the switchboard in the A-Building lobby. Repetitive issuance of ID cards will be monitored and addressed as needed. Lost ID cards must be replaced and a fee of $5.00 is charged for each duplicate card. Students will need to pay the fee at the Business Office and bring the receipt to the Nesmith Student Center in order to have their ID card replaced.

All on-campus Basic Skills students must obtain an SCC Basic Skills identification (ID) card issued in the Basic Skills Lab. The ID cards must be displayed visibly on the outer clothing at all times while on campus, and under no circumstances should they be altered or lent to another person. The card may be required for identification or participation in various student activities or events. Persons who do not have and/or display proper student identification may be subject to disciplinary sanctions and/or asked to leave campus. Lost ID cards must be replaced by an instructor in the Basic Skills Lab.

RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCES FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION CLASSES

In compliance with N.C.G.S. 115D-5, as amended in the 2010 legislative session, and 23 N.C.A.C. 02C.0213 of the state board of community colleges code, students are permitted a minimum of two excused days each academic year for religious observances required by their faith. Students will be entitled to make up any tests or other work missed due to an excused absence for religious observance. To be eligible for these excused absences, students must complete the written application process within the appropriate timeframe. (Policy 3.7)

Students are permitted to request up to two (2) excused absences per class each semester for religious observances required by the faith of the student. Continuing education students will be granted the opportunity to make up work missed while absent from class for excused religious observances. The following outlines student and instructor responsibilities associated with these requests: (Procedure 3.7.2)

  • Students must provide written request(s) for absence(s) to their instructor(s) at least one week in advance of religious observance. The written request should include student name, the course title, date of absence and a brief description of religious observance. Written requests will become part of class file(s) and will be turned in with attendance sheets at the end of each class.
  • Instructor(s) will assist students on a case-by-case basis to make-up missed work.

The above procedure does not supersede continuing education attendance requirements for satisfactory course completion.

WORKFORCE CONTINUING EDUCATION GRADE APPEAL PROCESS

Grades are determined by the instructor and based on a fair and consistent system for all students. Appeals concerning grades given for a course must be directed to the instructor that assigned the grade. The instructor assigning the grade and the student appealing the grade shall discuss the issue and attempt to resolve the difference. Every reasonable effort should be made to resolve the issue at this level. This initial conference should occur within five working days of the issuance of the grade or the end of the semester. If the instructor and student fail to reach a satisfactory resolution at this level, the student may appeal according to the procedures described below:

  • The student shall present the appeal in writing to the respective program coordinator/director within five working days after the conference with the instructor. The program coordinator/director shall confer with the student and instructor and attempt to seek a resolution by mutual agreement. (If applicable, the student should continue to attend classes throughout the appeal process.)
  • If the student wishes to appeal the final decision of the program coordinator/director, the student must appeal in writing to the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development within five working days of the decision. The Vice President of Workforce and Community Development will convene the Workforce Continuing Education Review Committee.
  • The Workforce Continuing Education Review Committee will consist of two instructors, at least one of whom, if possible, shall be qualified to teach the course; and a program coordinator/director. The instructor assigning the grade does not serve on the committee. During the appeal process, the appropriate program coordinator/director and/or instructor will provide all relevant information to the Continuing Education Review Committee. The student’s written appeal will be provided to the committee.
  • The instructor and student shall be afforded the opportunity to personally appear and provide pertinent information to the committee and ask questions of anyone providing documentation to the committee. Upon receipt of all relevant information, the committee shall determine whether the grade assigned by the instructor shall be upheld.
  • Should the committee find the grade received by the student as appropriate, the committee chair will communicate the decision to the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development and upon approval by the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development, draft a response to the student within five working days.
  • If the grade is not upheld, the committee shall make a decision as to how the grade shall be assigned to the student and will communicate the decision to the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development. If the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development approves of the decision, the Vice President shall notify, in writing, the instructor; the student; and the appropriate program coordinator/director of the committee’s decision within five working days. The grade must be submitted within college guidelines.
  • If the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development does not approve the committee’s decision, the Vice President will respond to the student, the instructor, the appropriate program coordinator, and the committee members, with his/her decision within five working days.
  • The decision of the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development is final.

Failure of a student to pursue a grade appeal in accordance with the provisions of this process or any publications derived there from shall be deemed unacceptable and the grade assigned will be the grade of record.

This process shall apply to all continuing education courses offered by the College regardless of length, credit awarded, method of delivery, time of delivery or other factors.

STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCESS – WORKFORCE AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

The procedures described in this section are open to any student seeking resolution for what he/she perceives to be unfair treatment in a student-to-student or student- to-employee interaction during his/her association with SCC. General grievance appeals concerning processes, disciplinary actions or alleged unjust or discriminatory treatment may be addressed through this process. Grievances involving sexual harassment will be addressed by following Procedure 2.7.1, Anti-Harassment.

INFORMAL RESOLUTION

Within five business days following the event in question, the grievant must discuss the grievance with the individual who is perceived to be the source of the concern.

FORMAL RESOLUTION

Step 1: In the event that the grievance is not resolved informally, the grievant must meet with the supervisor/program director of the respondent individual against who said grievance has been filed, within five business days of the informal resolution meeting, and submit, in writing, a detailed explanation of the events or circumstances relevant to the grievance. This explanation should fully describe all aspects of the grievance, so it can be reviewed at every stage of the grievance process. Any necessary or pertinent documentation relevant to the grievance should be submitted with the written explanation.

The supervisor/program director has up to five business days to conduct an investigation, which includes affording the respondent an opportunity to provide a written response to said grievance. The supervisor is responsible for forwarding his/her written decision and all supporting documentation to the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development and the grievant. The grievant decision will be sent via official SCC e-mail, and documents will be sent by U.S. Postal Service.

 Step 2: If the grievance is not resolved in Step 1, the grievant must contact the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development in which the individual is assigned within five business days of receipt of the response from the supervisor/program director and request a meeting to discuss the grievance. The five-day period begins the day following the official SCC e-mail that was sent by the supervisor.

After meeting with the grievant, the vice President has up to ten business days to conduct an investigation, which includes affording the respondent and the supervisor and/or student an opportunity to provide a written response to said grievance. The vice President is responsible for forwarding his/her written decision and all supporting documentation to all parties involved. The grievant copy will be sent via the official SCC e-mail system and the US Postal Service.

 Step 3: If the grievant or the respondent is not satisfied with the response from the vice President, either individual may request a hearing by the Student Grievance Committee. The individual must complete a Request for Hearing form within five business days from the date that the official SCC e-mail was sent. The request for a hearing must be made to the Vice President of Student Services. The Vice President of Student Services will convene the Student Grievance Committee.

STUDENT GRIEVANCE COMMITTEE FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN WORKFORCE CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS

The Grievance Committee for workforce continuing education issues is made up of two continuing education students, one continuing education instructor, and two continuing education staff persons. Appointments to the Workforce Continuing Education Grievance Committee are made by the President or his/her designee.

PROCEDURES FOR THE STUDENT GRIEVANCE COMMITTEES

No one can serve on the Student Grievance Committee if they have any involvement in the grievance. The Vice President of Student Services will schedule a hearing within five business days of receipt of the Hearing Request form. Following the hearing, the committee will communicate the decision to the Vice President of Student Services and upon approval from the Vice President of Student Services, draft a response to the grievant within five business days. If the committee’s finding is not approved, the Vice President of Student Services will draft the response to the grievant.

THE DECISION OF THE STUDENT GRIEVANCE

If this document is not accessible, contact Disability Services at 910.788.6327, disabilityservices@sccnc.edu, or in A-124.
Committee and Vice President of Student Services is final. The response will be sent to the grievant via the preferred method of communication. Copies of the decision will be provided to the President and all individuals involved in the grievance process.

EXCEPTIONS

  • All parties will receive written notification of any deviation from specified time frame.
  • The following exceptions apply if the respondent is a vice President or dean. The Step 1 supervisor shall be another Vice President appointed by the President. Step 2 will be omitted in the event that the grievance is against a Vice President or dean. If the Vice President of Student Services is involved in the grievance, the individual will request a hearing through the President’s Office. In the event that the grievance involves the President, the grievance form is forwarded to the President’s executive assistant, who in turn forwards the grievance to the Chair of the Board of Trustees.

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

DUE PROCESS

Academic institutions exist for the transmission of knowledge, the pursuit of truth, the development of students, and the general wellbeing of society. Free inquiry and free expression are indispensable to the attainment of these goals. As members of this academic community, students are encouraged to develop the capacity for critical judgment and to engage in a sustained and independent search for truth.

Freedom to teach and freedom to learn are inseparable facets of academic freedom. The freedom to learn depends upon appropriate opportunities and conditions in the classroom, on the campus, and in the community. Students should exercise their freedom with responsibility.

As members of the larger community of which the College is a part, students are entitled to all rights and protection accorded them by the laws of that Community.

By the same token, students are also subject to all laws, the enforcement of which is the responsibility of duly constituted authorities. When students violate laws, they may incur penalties prescribed by legal authorities. In such instances, college discipline is initiated when the presence of the students on campus or at college sponsored activities disrupts the educational process of the college, or if college discipline is required by law. When students’ violations of the law also adversely affect the college’s pursuit of its recognized educational objectives, the College may enforce its own regulations. When students violate college regulations, they are subject to disciplinary action by the College whether or not their conduct violates the law. If students’ behavior simultaneously violates both college regulations and the law, the College may take disciplinary action independent of that taken by legal authorities.

RIGHTS

  • All rights and privileges guaranteed to every citizen by the Constitution of the United States and by the state of North Carolina are not denied to students.
  • Students are free to pursue their educational goals. Appropriate opportunities for learning in the classroom and on the campus are provided by the college. Student performance is evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards.
  • Students have the right to freedom of expression, inquiry, and assembly without restraint or censorship subject to reasonable and non-discriminatory rules and regulations regarding time, place, and manner.
  • Students have the right to inquire about and to propose improvements in policies, regulations, and procedures affecting government procedures, campus committees, and college offices.
  • No disciplinary sanctions other than temporary removal from class or activity (only for duration of said activity) may be imposed upon students without due process. Due process procedures are established to guarantee students respondent of student code of conduct violations the right to a hearing, a presentation of charges; and evidence for charges, the right to present evidence; the right to have witnesses on their behalf and to hear witnesses on behalf of the complainant (s); and the right of appeal.

APPROPRIATE ACADEMIC BEHAVIORS

In order to create the most effective classroom environment possible to support learning, faculty and staff expect the following behaviors from students:

  • Academic Participation: Students should express their views in classroom discussions in an appropriate manner when asked. Students should also listen respectfully to others expressing their opinions and ideas. The exchange of ideas in a non-combative, non-abusive, and orderly manner is essential for learning and fundamental to academic freedom.
  • Academic Environment: Students should not disrupt the learning environment through any inappropriate behavior. It is the responsibility of the instructor to ensure that the appropriate learning environment exists in the class and remove from the class any student who disrupts the climate and interferes with other students’ right to learn. Examples of inappropriate activities include, but are not limited to the following: using profanity or offensive language, texting or using cell phones, using other electronic devices to listen to music or to listen or view anything else not class related, attempting to carry on personal business with an instructor during class time, and carrying on side conversations.
  • Academic Courtesy: Students should be in class for the complete class session. Entering a classroom late or leaving early is disruptive to the instructor and other students. If rare instances make students late for class, they should enter quietly, be seated as close to the door as possible, and draw as little attention as possible. Students should never leave early without the instructor’s permission. Students should see the instructor after class to explain their lateness since the instructor may have already taken attendance.
  • Academic Responsibility: Students bear the responsibility for knowing what was covered in a missed class. They should inform an instructor before being absent from a class, (if possible.) Students have the responsibility to find out in advance, if possible, the assignments and activities for the missed class. Students are responsible for arranging any make up work and completing assignments due at the next class period. Students should not expect to be able to make up all work missed, especially unannounced quizzes or tests. Students are responsible for knowing what was covered in the missed class and getting notes from other classmates. It is not the responsibility of the instructor to re-teach what was missed. Individual instructor’s policies will vary and will be documented in the course syllabus, but it is still a student responsibility to know what was missed. Students should understand that faculty are in the classroom to aid them in learning, but that faculty also have the responsibility to certify that students have met the required outcomes of the course. Ultimately, students are responsible for their own learning and success.
  • Academic Focus: Students must focus on a class’s activities while in that class. They must not work on non-related activities or sleep. If Internet use is a part of the class, students should use it only for class prescribed activities.
  • Academic Exchange: Students need to be prepared for a class to more effectively learn. There cannot be an effective exchange between an instructor and students without this preparation. Being prepared means reading any assigned work for the class and noting questions or reactions to the reading, preparing any requested written work, or preparing questions to ask in the class. Students always have homework in a class even if nothing is specifically assigned. At the least, students should review previous class notes to check their understanding and be prepared to ask questions the next class session if they don’t.

STUDENT CONDUCT

Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with generally accepted standards of scholarship and morality. The purpose of this code is not to restrict student rights, but to protect the rights of individuals in their academic pursuits. (Policy 4.5)

GENERAL EXPECTATIONS

Either inside the classroom or in any activities on campus or in other facilities where the College carries out classes or activities, students should observe the following:

  • Students should have food or drink only in appropriate locations. Food and drink are not permitted in classrooms, labs or the auditorium.
  • Students should treat each other and all college personnel with respect in all interactions.
  • On-campus Basic Skills students must abide by the rules stated in their signed agreement form entitled “SCC Basic Skills Program On-Campus Rules” in addition to the expectations stated in this section and the section above.
  • Students must abide by all policies and procedures governing their behavior in the Policies and Procedures Manual, the Student Handbook, and in the Academic Catalog.
    The following types of student behavior may result in one of the sanctions described in the next section.
    If this document is not accessible, contact Disability Services at 910.788.6327, disabilityservices@sccnc.edu, or in A-124.
  • Academic Dishonesty, that is, taking or acquiring possession of any academic material (test information, research papers, notes) from a member of the College staff or student body without permission; receiving or giving help during tests; submitting papers or reports that are supposed to be original work but are not entirely the student’s own; and not giving credit for others’ work (plagiarism).
  • Theft of, misuse of, or damage to college property or theft of or damage to property of a member of the College community or a campus visitor on college premises or at college functions; unauthorized entry upon the property of the College or into a college facility or a portion thereof which has been restricted in use and thereby placed off limits; unauthorized presence in a college facility after closing hours.
  • Possession of or use of alcoholic beverages or being in a state of intoxication on the College campus or at college sponsored or supervised functions off campus or in college owned vehicles; possession, use or distribution of any illegal drugs, except as expressly permitted by law. Any influence that may be attributed to the use of drugs or of alcoholic beverages shall not in any way limit the responsibility of the individual for the consequences of his/her actions.
  • Lewd or indecent conduct, including public physical or verbal action or distribution of obscene or libelous written material.
  • Vulgar and offensive clothing is prohibited. Underwear must not be visible. Shirts and shoes must be worn at all times.
  • Mental or physical abuse, injury, or attempt to injure any person on college premises or at college-sponsored or college-supervised functions, including verbal or physical actions which threaten or endanger the health or safety of any such persons or which promote hatred or racial prejudice.
  • Any act, comment, or behavior which is of a sexually suggestive or harassing nature and which in any way interferes with a student’s or an employee’s performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment.
  • Intentional obstruction or disruption of teaching, research, administration or disciplinary proceedings, or other college activities, including public service functions and other duly authorized activities on college premises.
  • Occupation or seizure in any manner of college property, a college facility, or any portion thereof for a use inconsistent with prescribed, customary, or authorized use.
  • Participating in or conducting an assembly, demonstration, or gathering in a manner which threatens or causes injury to persons or property, which interferes with free access to, ingress or egress of college facilities, and which is harmful, obstructive or disruptive to the educational process or institutional functions of the college; remaining at the scene of such an assembly after being asked to leave by a representative of the College staff.
  • Possession or use of a firearm, incendiary device, or explosive, except in connection with a college-approved activity. This also includes unauthorized use of any instrument designed to inflict serious bodily injury to any person.
  • Setting off a fire alarm or using or tampering with any fire safety equipment, except with reasonable belief in the need for such alarm or equipment.ambling.
  • Smoking and/or using other tobacco forms, including vaping.
  • Littering on the campus or in buildings.
  • Violation of college regulations regarding the operation and parking of motor vehicles.
  • Forgery, alteration, or misuse of college documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to deceive.
  • Violation of the terms of disciplinary probation or any college regulation during the period of probation.
  • Fiscal irresponsibility such as failure to pay college-levied fines, failure to repay college-funded loans, or the passing of worthless checks to college officials.
  • Violation of a local, state, or federal criminal law on college premises that adversely affects the College community’s pursuit of its proper educational purposes.
  • Disobedience of the reasonable directions of college employees, including administrators, faculty, security, and other staff employees.

STUDENT CONDUCT

The College reserves the right to maintain a safe and orderly educational environment for students and staff. Therefore, when, in the judgment of college officials, a student’s conduct disrupts or threatens to disrupt the College community, appropriate disciplinary action is taken to restore and protect the sanctity of the community.

INTERIM SUSPENSION

If an act of misconduct threatens the health or well-being of any member of the academic community or seriously disrupts the function and good order of the college, an instructor or administrative officer may direct students involved to cease and desist such conduct and advise them that failing to cease and desist results in immediate suspension. If students fail to cease and desist, the instructor or administrative officer may then suspend them from the class or the College until a resolution of the matter can be made. The instructor or administrative officer invoking such suspension notifies the appropriate workforce continuing

education program director/coordinator in writing of the individuals involved and the nature of the infraction as soon as possible but no later than 24 hours after the incident.
The appropriate workforce continuing education program director/coordinator is responsible for implementing student discipline procedures.

Conduct Procedures

In order to provide an orderly protocol for handling student disciplinary cases in accordance with due process and justice, the following procedures are followed:

  • Charges: Any administrative official, instructor, or student may file charges with the appropriate workforce continuing education program director/coordinator against any student or student organization for violations of college regulations.

The individual(s) initiating the action must specify, in writing, the following:

  1. Name of the student(s) involved
  2. The alleged violation of the specific code of conduct
  3. The time, place, and date of the incident
  4. Names of person(s) directly involved or witnesses to the infractions
  5. Any action taken that related to the matter
  6. Desired solution(s)

The completed charge form is forwarded directly to the program director/coordinator.

INVESTIGATION AND DECISION

Within five working days after the charge is filed, the program director/coordinator completes an investigation of the charge and reviews findings with the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development. After discussing the infraction with the vice President, the program director/coordinator meets with the respondent student(s) to discuss the alleged infraction at which time the program director/coordinator impose a sanction consistent with those described below.

SANCTIONS

  • Reprimand: The student receives a written communication, which gives official notice that any subsequent offense against the Student Code of Conduct carries heavier penalties because of this prior infraction. A record of this communication will be maintained.
  • General Probation: An individual may be placed on General Probation when involved in a minor disciplinary offense or based upon a student’s history of sanctions. General Probation has two important implications: the individual is given a chance to show his/her capability and willingness to observe the Student Code of Conduct without further penalty; secondly, if he/she errs again, further action is taken. This probation can be in effect for up to one year from the time the initial decision is made and all appeals are final.
  • Restrictive Probation: Restrictive Probation results in loss of good standing and may be used depending upon the severity of the violation and the student’s history of sanctions. Restrictive conditions may limit activity in the College community. Unless otherwise noted, the individual is not eligible for initiation into any local or national organization and may not receive any college award or other honorary recognition. The individual may not occupy a position of leadership or responsibility with any college or student organization, publication, or activity. This probation can be in effect for up to one year from the time the initial decision is made and all appeals are final. Any violation of Restrictive Probation may result in immediate suspension.
  • Restitution: The individual must pay for damaging, misusing, destroying, or losing property belonging to the college, college personnel, or students.
  • Interim Suspension: The student is excluded from class and/or other privileges or activities as set forth in the notice, until a final decision has been made concerning the alleged violation.
  • Loss of Academic Credit or Grade: This sanction is imposed as a result of academic dishonesty or suspension for violation of the Student Code of Conduct.
  • Withholding of Transcript, Diploma, or Right to Register: This sanction is imposed when financial obligations are not met.
  • Suspension: The student is excluded from class(es) and/or all other privileges or activities of the College for a specific period of time. This sanction is reserved for those offenses warranting discipline more severe than probation or for repeated misconduct. Students who receive this sanction must get specific written permission from the Vice President of Workforce and Community Development before returning to campus.
  • Expulsion: The student is dismissed from campus for an indefinite period. The student loses his/her student status. The student may be readmitted to the College only with the approval of the President.

APPEAL PROCESS

To appeal a disciplinary decision, a student may request a hearing by the Student Grievance Committee. Refer to Step 3, Formal Resolution, in the Student Grievance Process.